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Intel Pentium 4 Hyper Threading Extreme Edition Processors
By  Super Admin  | Published  11/26/2006 | Processors | Rating:
Intel Pentium 4 Hyper Threading Extreme Edition Processors
Model Number Frequency L2-Cache L3-Cache Front Side Bus Multiplier Voltage TDP Socket Release Date Part Number(s)
Pentium 4 EE 3.2 3200 MHz 512 KiB 2048 KiB 800 MT/s 16x 1.575 V 92.1 W Socket 478 September 16, 2003 RK80532PG0882M
Pentium 4 EE 3.4 3400 MHz 512 KiB 2048 KiB 800 MT/s 17x 1.575 V 102.9 W Socket 478 February 1, 2004 RK80532PG0962M
Pentium 4 EE 3.4 3400 MHz 512 KiB 2048 KiB 800 MT/s 17x 1.525/1.6 V 109.6 W LGA 775 June 2004 JM80532PG0962M
Pentium 4 EE 3.46 3466 MHz 512 KiB 2048 KiB 1066 MT/s 13x 1.525/1.6 V 110.7 W LGA 775 October 31, 2004 JM80532PH0992M

 

Model Number Frequency L2-Cache Front Side Bus Multiplier Voltage TDP Socket Release Date Part Number(s)
Pentium 4 EE 3.73 3733 MHz 2048 KiB 1066 MT/s 14x 1.2/1.4 V 115 W LGA 775 February 20, 2005 JM08547PH1092M

In September 2003, at the Intel Developer Forum, the Pentium 4 Extreme Edition (P4EE) was announced, just over a week before the launch of Athlon 64, and Athlon 64 FX (AMD64 FX). The design was mostly identical to Pentium 4 (to the extent that it would run in the same motherboards), but differed by an added 2 MiB of Level 3 cache. It shared the same Gallatin core as the Xeon MP, though in a Socket 478 form factor (as opposed to Socket 603 for the Xeon MP) and with an 800 MT/s bus, twice as fast as that of the Xeon MP. An LGA 775 version is also available.

While Intel maintained that the Extreme Edition was aimed at gamers, some viewed it as an attempt to steal the Athlon 64's launch thunder, nicknaming it the "Emergency Edition". Many condemned Intel for cannibalizing the Xeon line, but because of this, no such complaints were aimed at AMD, who retaliated by doing the same with their Athlon 64 FX.

The effect of the added cache was somewhat variable. In office applications, the Extreme Edition was generally a bit slower than the Northwood, owing to higher latency added by the L3 cache. Some games benefited from the added cache, particularly those based on the Quake III and Unreal engines. However, the area which improved the most was multimedia encoding, which was not only faster than the Pentium 4, but also both Athlon 64s.

A slight performance increase was achieved in late 2004 by increasing the bus speed from 800 MT/s to 1066 MT/s. Only one Gallatin-based chip at 3.46 GHz was released before the Extreme Edition was migrated to the Prescott core. The new 3.73 GHz Extreme Edition had the same features as a 6x0-sequence Prescott 2M, but with a 1066 MT/s bus. In practice however, the 3.73 GHz Extreme Edition almost always proved to be slower than the 3.46 GHz version.

The 'Pentium 4 Extreme Edition' should not be confused with a similarly-named later model, the 'Pentium Extreme Edition', which is based on the dual-core Pentium D.

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